Double Top from Two Jaguar Arrows

Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), January 27, 2012 | Go to article overview

Double Top from Two Jaguar Arrows


Byline: STEVE ORME

COMPETITIVE is a word readily attached to the motor industry. Competitive as two Yorkshire terriers chasing a trapped rat - obviously without the silly hair and that annoying thing they do to your leg.

Ever since Mr Benz decided sitting down may be the way to drive, makers have matched equipment blow for blow.

Today you will find manual windows, for instance, in a house. And it is very easy to start a list of passive safety features reading like the batting order of a 1930s England cricket team. Therefore I propose a classification grading based on social aspirations. Communist Utopia will include bicycles and anything you drive where the steering wheel feels like a bonus. Coalition covers the massive middle ground of family motoring and Eurocrat indicates a train so full of gravy some slight staining is almost inevitable.

As a result, when it comes to the Jaguar XF three-litre diesel S there is no need to point out that along with a raft of safety features including pedestrian sensors, more air bags than the Royal Balloon Corps and idiot-proof traction it has electric seats, a full muti-media deck and even a diesel misuse device.

In fact the XF has everything. Just like all the other Eurocrats costing pounds 50,000. It is complete. In fact it is replete.

This leaves plenty of scope for focusing on the real attraction of the XF - making you feel very good indeed. Proud even that in Britain there are still some things we do best, Frau Merkel. From memory I cannot recall an instance previously where I have become romantically attached to a headlining. But so sensuous is the suede and leather finish in this Jag, traffic congestion becomes as an opportunity for some light petting, not an inconvenience. Unless you would rather hear about its four cup holders. …

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