Review: A Monster in Paris

Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), January 27, 2012 | Go to article overview

Review: A Monster in Paris


STARRING: The voices of Adam Goldberg, Jay Harrington, Vanessa Paradis, Sean Lennon, Danny Huston DIRECTOR: Bibo Bergeron CERTIFICATE: U RUNNING TIME: 89 mins REVIEWER'S RATING: ??? SHOWING: Cineworld, Showcase & VUE A FLEA nurtures a passion for music in Bibo Bergeron's computer-animated fable that teaches us to never judge a wingless, blood-sucking parasite by its spiny legs or hairy abdomen.

A Monster In Paris puts a colourful, Gallic spin on the classic fairytale of Beauty And The Beast, using the power of song to bring together two characters who are a world (and species) apart.

Bergeron demonstrates a light touch, providing some decent laughs and energetic set pieces despite a flimsy script that stretches the narrative and romantic subplots too thinly.

Themes of tolerance and compassion are loudly addressed so that young audiences will understand the true monsters here are the power-hungry men who feed off the fear and paranoia of the public.

"When people are frightened, they need protection, they need a saviour... in short, they need me," snarls the film's moustachioed villain as he plots the manipulation of voters for personal gain.

However, good must ultimately vanquish doubt and despair, set to a jaunty soundtrack of original music composed by Matthieu Chedid and sung by Sean Lennon and Vanessa Paradis.

The year is 1910 and Paris has been ravaged by floods, leading to the construction of rickety wooden bridges to allow the city's denizens to traverse the bloated Seine.

Cinema projectionist Emile (Jay Harrington) agrees to help truck driver Raoul (Adam Goldberg) make a delivery to a gargantuan greenhouse owned by a scientist. …

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