WHY NOT RUN WITH ME? Grieving Lyndsay's Race for Life Rally Cry

Evening Gazette (Middlesbrough, England), January 27, 2012 | Go to article overview

WHY NOT RUN WITH ME? Grieving Lyndsay's Race for Life Rally Cry


Byline: KRYSTA EAVES

DESPITE losing her dad only a month ago, Lyndsay Madden is determined to run Cancer Research UK's Race For Life.

And the 31-year-old mum-of-three is calling on Teesside women to join her and help the charity raise vital funds.

Lyndsay's dad, David Anderson, was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer in December 2010. Just one year later, on December 27, coach driver David, 62, from Thornaby, passed away, leaving behind wife Janet, 53.

Lyndsay, mum to Alex, nine, Apryl, four, and Matilda, two, said: "It's difficult to deal with but I wanted to turn something traumatic into something positive.

"It's awful to watch somebody deteriorate so I just wanted to do anything I could to help raise money and awareness."

Lyndsay, a gymnastic coach from Ingleby Barwick, began running shortly after her dad was first diagnosed, and she took part in last year's Race For Life.

"Dad said I was crazy," said Lyndsay, who is married to Marcel, a 47-year-old company director "I used to run to his house, wave at him and he used to laugh at me. I'd have a cup of tea and then I'd run back home again."

This year Lyndsay, who hopes to train as a teaching assistant, is challenging herself to beat her previous time of 38 minutes and to raise even more cash. …

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