Sometimes You Have to Wonder about Parents

Fraser Coast Chronicle (Hervey Bay, Australia), February 3, 2012 | Go to article overview

Sometimes You Have to Wonder about Parents


HOME-schooled children are no smarter or dumber than the average child attending our educational facilities.

But sometimes you do have to wonder about their parents.

It was revealed last week that more than 50,000 Australian children were being home-schooled a and probably more than that because those responsible for their educational welfare are not registering.

When asked why she was willing to risk a fine for not registering her daughter for home-schooling, one bright spark replied she couldn't be bothered doing the necessary paperwork. There were just soooo many forms to fill out.

Too hard was it, love? A tad taxing on the brain?

Well, what makes you think ensuring your daughter reaches a suitable standard in reading, writing and arithmetic is going to be a walk in the park?

Planning to just give up if it all gets a little tiresome?

Another man defended his lazy fellow home-schooler.

He claimed parents knew best about what their kids should learn, and those children registered for home-schooling were disadvantaged because they were then required to follow the same curriculum as those attending schools.

He saw this as problematic because it meant the home-schoolers would end up just like every other student, unable to read or write.

Whoa, big guy.

Are you saying you have some sort of God-given right to absolute and total control over what your child learns?

Are you so fearful of your child hearing contrary opinions and differing viewpoints?

Do you think this enforced insularity will somehow make your child cleverer than those taught a variety of material by a variety of qualified educators? A broad base of learning is of far more benefit to an emerging adult than some narrow opinion of what an individual parent believes their child needs to learn. …

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