The Ruling Religion in Schools

By Williamsen, Kurt | The New American, January 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Ruling Religion in Schools


Williamsen, Kurt, The New American


Christmas came again --: along with the numerous lawsuits and public prohibitions against public displays of Christianity. Many agree with making Christianity invisible because the phrase "separation of church and state" is repeated so often that even school kids can recite it with little prompting.

But even aside from the fact that there is no such phraseology in the Constitution or Bill of Rights, that Congress has opened with a prayer since its inception, that several states had state religions, and that every state's constitution opens with praise to God, it's a ludicrous notion: As Christianity is heaved out of the public sphere, other religions take its place.

In fact, bans on public Christianity are strictly meant to eliminate Christian morals, not to adhere to the law. This should be obvious to anyone: While prayers are yanked from commencement ceremonies, and our Christian roots are removed from social studies/history classes, the Islamic religion is welcomed.

As Janet Levy at American Thinker noted, students at Excelsior Middle School in Discovery Bay. California, had to take Muslim names, recite Islamic prayers, and celebrate Ramadan. Carver Elementary in San Diego provided prayer time for Muslims, removed pork from menus, and segregated classes by gender. "The University of Michigan, a taxpayer-funded school, has provided separate prayer rooms and ritual foot baths, requiring bathroom modifications costing over $100,000, for Muslim observances." Also, the federal government is forcing the Berkeley, Illinois, school district to adjust its time-off policy so that a teacher may take a pilgrimage to Mecca during the school year. The list goes on.

And Islam is not even the dominant religion taught in public-schools; "secular humanism''--which posits that humans are the central beings of the universe and that science, logic, and reason should be the basis for morality and decision making--takes those honors in kids" school-day devotions.

Yes, secular humanism is a religion!

What is religion? It is any system of beliefs, practices, and ethical values underlying a code of behavior and a philosophy. (No, religion is not the "worship" of a supreme God; otherwise, Shintoism and Buddhism would not qualify as religions.) As part of "humanist" religious education, public schools teach that no family situation is inherently better than another and that morals are relative and should be reevaluated for each situation--essentially saying there is no absolute right or wrong (teaching ethics, of a sort). …

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