Is Lana del Ray the New Nancy Sinatra - or Is She Just a Fake?

Daily Mail (London), February 3, 2012 | Go to article overview

Is Lana del Ray the New Nancy Sinatra - or Is She Just a Fake?


Byline: ADRIAN THRILLS

LANA DEL RAY

Born To Die (Interscope

Verdict: Believe (some of) the hype ***

WHEN she posted a low-budget film for her haunting song Video Games online last summer, Lana Del Rey seemed to arrive from nowhere as a fully formed star.

Styling herself as 'the gangster Nancy Sinatra', she looked the part. With her beestung lips and big hair, she harked back to the faded glamour of old Hollywood.

The clip, supposedly homemade, also had the desired effect. Video Games has been viewed 20 million times online, which made this album one of the year's most anticipated releases. There have been mutterings that the singer is not what she seems. Her critics claim she has had the support of a major record label, Interscope, all along, and there have even been suggestions, denied by Del Rey, that those pouting lips are not entirely natural.

She was born 25 years ago and raised as plain old Elizabeth Grant in the small, rural town of Lake Placid. Moving to Brooklyn as an 18-yearold student, she took her music more seriously. Influenced by Elvis Presley and Jeff Buckley, she wrote a few songs, played a few gigs as Lizzy Grant and released an independent album. She wore jeans and a T-shirt on stage. But just as Stefani Germanotta's career took flight when she became Lady Gaga, Lizzy's reinvention as a sultry vamp looks inspired. …

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Is Lana del Ray the New Nancy Sinatra - or Is She Just a Fake?
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