Library Showcases Black History

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

Library Showcases Black History


Byline: Elena Ferrarin eferrarin@dailyherald.com

Gail Borden Public Library patron Diana Carson had barely started to check out the annual Black History Family Festival on Saturday in Elgin when she learned something new.

"I read about the Buffalo Soldiers; I didn't know about them," said Carson, of Elgin, referring to African-American cavalrymen who served in regiments formed beginning in 1866.

Carson's second stop was a children's crafts station, where her sons Demetrius, 6, and Darius, 9, were working on coloring drawings of traffic lights. The invention of the traffic light is credited to Garret Morgan, an African-

American.

The theme of the annual festival, attended by hundreds of people and now in its seventh year, was "African American Firsts: Black Americans Who Have Shaped Our Country." It featured cultural and artistic displays, dancing, storytelling and booths staffed by various vendors and community organizations. New this year was a talk by award-winning author Candy Dawson Boyd.

Five students from Elgin Area School District U-46 received the "Future African American Leaders" award for their academic performance, community involvement and overall career goals. …

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