A Letter from ITEEA's President

By Bell, Thomas R. | Technology and Engineering Teacher, February 2012 | Go to article overview

A Letter from ITEEA's President


Bell, Thomas R., Technology and Engineering Teacher


Dear Colleagues,

Many of you have become aware of the recent release of the report by the National Research Council of The Academies directed by the National Board on Science Education entitled A Framework for K-12 Science Standards: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. This report can be accessed via www.nationalacademies.org/bose.

The significance of this report is the direction that it proposes for K-12 science education, including a strong emphasis on technology and engineering. One could argue that technology and engineering should or should not be a part of the science curriculum of the future. However, the reality is that this report is public and will affect future science standards. By its nature, it is aimed at providing a different area of the curriculum where technology and engineering will be taught. Just as technology and engineering teachers teach some science, this science framework now places a stronger emphasis on science teachers teaching more about technology and engineering. This report certainly has the potential to change the positioning of these subjects in our schools.

The Science Board acknowledges that, "Many high schools already have courses designated as technology, design, or even engineering that go beyond the limited introduction to these topics specified in the framework:' The report further states, "We (the Board) simply maintain that some introduction to engineering practice, the application of science, and the interrelationship of science and technology is integral to the learning of science for all students." The Framework is," ... not intended to define course structure, particularly at the high school level." However, that does not preclude the Framework from doing so.

Technology and engineering educators should be proactive in their response to this report. Educators outside of our field will be discussing how they will be using this framework to create science core standards in every state. Technology and engineering educators need to be a part of those discussions to provide support to the science community as they attempt to teach more about our content.

ITEEA suggests the following steps for every concerned technology and engineering educator as it relates to this study:

   Read the report, become familiar with the general direction, goals,
   and progression as it relates to technology and engineering. You
   will find that many concepts and ideas are being taught by the
   current technology and engineering teacher. … 

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