A Religious War Pulled out of Thin Air

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 16, 2012 | Go to article overview

A Religious War Pulled out of Thin Air


At ease, Christian soldiers. There is no "war on religion," no assault on the Catholic Church. A faith that has endured for thousands of years will survive even Nicki Minaj.

It never occurred to me to evaluate the Grammy Awards show on theological rectitude, but apparently we're supposed to be outraged at the over-the-top "exorcism" Minaj performed Sunday night. The hip-hop diva, who writhed and cavorted amid a riot of religious iconography, is accused of anti-Catholic bigotry -- and seen as an enemy combatant in an escalating "war on religion" being waged by "secular elites," which seems to be used as a synonym for "Democrats."

Seriously? Are we really going to pretend that Christianity is somehow under siege? That the Almighty would have been any more offended Sunday than he was, say, in 2006, when Madonna -- who could sue Minaj for theft of intellectual property -- performed a song during her touring act while being mock-crucified on a mirrored cross? While wearing a crown of thorns? Even at her show in Rome?

The "war on religion" alarmists are just like Minaj and Madonna in one key respect: Lacking a coherent point to make, they go for shock value.

Among the loudest voices, predictably, are those of the Republican presidential candidates. President Obama is indeed waging a war on religion, Mitt Romney claimed last week at the Conservative Political Action Conference. Romney promised to rescind every "Obama regulation" that somehow "attacks our religious liberty."

Newt Gingrich said at CPAC that Obama plans to "wage war" on the Catholic Church if he is re-elected. Those who don't see this coming are not familiar with "who (the president) really is." Apparently, the real Obama is about to come out of hiding, any day now.

But it is Rick Santorum who wins the award for histrionics. Progressives, he said last week in Texas, are "taking faith and crushing it. …

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