Obama's Bleak View of African-Americans; Pandering White House Budget Reveals Prejudice

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 17, 2012 | Go to article overview

Obama's Bleak View of African-Americans; Pandering White House Budget Reveals Prejudice


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

President Obama's 2013 budget doesn't address the nation's debt crisis. Instead, it is a blatant attempt to pander to his base in an election year. To make the goal even more obvious, the White House released fact sheets targeted to key constituencies highlighting programs the administration believes are suited to their needs.

The White House thought blacks would be most interested in programs to prevent those in jail from going back to a life of crime. Such funding was not touted among other minority groups, like Hispanics and Asians. Mr. Obama appears to be perpetuating negative stereotypes of minority groups in his misguided efforts to win re-election.

The administration document, An Economy Built to Last and Security for African-American Families, highlights $831 million in the budget dedicated to prisoner re-entry programs run by the Justice Department. The funding includes $21 million for substance-abuse treatment programs in state and local prisons and jails, presuming a significant number of these must be alcoholics and drug addicts. The White House demonstrates a low opinion of young blacks by highlighting $85 million dedicated to reducing recidivism for ex-offenders and at-risk youth through counseling, job training and drug treatment.

As much as the White House seems to want to perpetuate these myths, most blacks are law-abiding citizens who love their country and want to live the American dream. The bad apples who find themselves sentenced to a federal or state prison account for only 1 out of 100, according to Justice Department and Census Bureau statistics. The focus should be on providing opportunity to all, regardless of race. …

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