Tracks and Traces: Thailand and the Work of Andrew Turton

By High, Holly | Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, February 2012 | Go to article overview

Tracks and Traces: Thailand and the Work of Andrew Turton


High, Holly, Journal of Southeast Asian Studies


Tracks and traces: Thailand and the work of Andrew Turton

Edited by PHILIP HIRSCH and NICHOLAS TAPP

Amsterdam University Press, 2010. Pp. 159. Photographs, Figures, Tables.

Tracks and traces is an attempt to reread the work of Andrew Turton in light of the changing context of Thai politics and society of (and in which) he wrote, and in terms of how this reading may be applied to Thailand today. Many of the chapters are concerned with recent Thai history (especially politics) and contain the various authors' reflections on Thai studies literature. This makes for interesting reading because, although the events and literature described will be familiar to most of the target audience, the chapters are brief, often polemical and highly readable. Each provides a succinct example of what the (often prominent) authors make of the field in overview and on reflection. Each chapter can be approached as a kind of 'position statement' that may reveal more about the author than about Thailand or Turton per se. Specialists of the region will thus find this a fascinating collection because it highlights the different ways these scholars 'read' Thai history and Thai studies.

Keyes starts the collection with a contribution outlining his take on the history of political events in the Northeast and his view that this must be understood in terms of a 'continuity of a distinctive ethno-regionalism in northeastern Thailand' (p. 25). Ganjanapan and Hirsch take a fascinating look at agrarian change, updating Turton's work in this area in light of the challenges of interpreting globalisation. Cohen usefully describes various anthropological interpretations of power and leadership in Thailand, many of them inspired by Turton. Glassman's lively and invigorating contribution presents an insightful reflection on the vicissitudes of radical scholarship. While not everyone will follow Glassman to his political conclusions, the historical survey he presents of the entanglements of scholarship and politics is insightful and provocative, and well worth the read. Chiengthong presents an account of modern subjectivities and political action that was to my mind remarkably inconclusive. Rigg uses Turton's early work on participation to reflect on the changing nature of development discourse. Reynolds provides a commentary on Turton's work on the history of slavery, noting the salience of debt bondage and other forms of unfree labour today.

While the book is written in a clear style that would be accessible for beginner students, much of the content takes the form of meta-level interpretation--the Thai studies of Thai studies--that would be of interest mostly to advanced students or specialists. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tracks and Traces: Thailand and the Work of Andrew Turton
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.