The Systems Analysis and Design Course: An Educators' Assessment of the Importance and Coverage of Topics

By Guidry, Brandi N.; Stevens, David P. et al. | Journal of Information Systems Education, Winter 2011 | Go to article overview

The Systems Analysis and Design Course: An Educators' Assessment of the Importance and Coverage of Topics


Guidry, Brandi N., Stevens, David P., Totaro, Michael W., Journal of Information Systems Education


1. INTRODUCTION

A Management Information Systems (MIS) curriculum should reflect the needs and expectations of industry, as this helps to ensure that students are adequately prepared for their employment. It is often quite difficult, however, to achieve this (Anandarajan and Lippert, 2006; Tang, Lee, and Koh, 2000). The "IS 2010 Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Programs in Information Systems," established by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Association for Information Systems (AIS), are designed to help with this alignment (Topi et al., 2010). The IS 2010 guidelines represent numerous perspectives of faculty and practitioners alike. Furthermore, they are developed with careful consideration of industry requirements and an understanding of organizational needs and expectations. Importantly, the IS 2010 Curriculum Guidelines identify the Systems Analysis and Design (SAD) course as a core in an MIS undergraduate curriculum Topi et al, 2010). Indeed, the suggested catalog description provided within the IS 2010 guidelines (Topi et al, 2010), shown below, amplifies the significance of the SAD course:

   This course discusses the processes, methods,
   techniques and tools that organizations use to
   determine how they should conduct their business,
   with a particular focus on how computer-based
   technologies can most effectively contribute to the
   way business is organized. The course covers a
   systematic methodology for analyzing a business
   problem or opportunity, determining what role, if
   any, computer-based technologies can play in
   addressing the business need, articulating business
   requirements for the technology solution,
   specifying alternative approaches to acquiring the
   technology capabilities needed to address the
   business requirements, and specifying the
   requirements for the information systems solution
   in particular, in-house development, development
   from third-party providers, or purchased
   commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) packages (p. 48)

In addition, employment projections are seemingly reflective of the importance of systems analysis and design.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (2011), employment of systems analysts is projected to grow significantly between 2008 and 2018 as compared to the average growth of all other occupations. In fact, employment of systems analysts is projected to increase by 20% during this time frame. As more advanced technologies continue to emerge and as increasing numbers of organizations seek to embrace these new innovations, the demand for these workers is expected to continue rising (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2011). It is necessary for IS professionals, and those training to become practitioners, to understand the complexities and uncertainties that exist in the utilization of these new technologies and applications for systems development. Thus, it is important for MIS students to have a good understanding of the systems development process, with sufficient knowledge of various methodologies, strategies, and techniques pertaining thereto.

What topics should be the focus in the SAD course? Presumably this question is important to those who teach the SAD course, as well as those who ultimately hire MIS graduates. This study examines instructors' perceptions regarding the skills and topics that are most important in the teaching of a Systems Analysis and Design course and the amount of class time devoted to each of the more traditional areas. This is an important step in determining if educational objectives related to SAD are in line with current industry needs. This paper begins with describing the motivation for the study, reviewing the literature on this topic, and presenting the research questions. The analysis, discussion, conclusions, and recommendations for future research follow.

2. MOTIVATION FOR STUDY

Anecdotal evidence suggests that Information Systems professionals seem to express more of an interest in using object-oriented modeling and analysis in the workplace. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Systems Analysis and Design Course: An Educators' Assessment of the Importance and Coverage of Topics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.