American Forests Celebrates the 40th Anniversary of the Clean Water Act

American Forests, Winter 2012 | Go to article overview

American Forests Celebrates the 40th Anniversary of the Clean Water Act


HEALTHY FORESTS AND CLEAN water are interdependent. About 60 percent of freshwater resources in this country come from forests, which cover about one-third of the nation's land area. Forests absorb rain, refill underground aquifers, cool and cleanse water, slow storm run off, reduce flooding, regulate the melting of the snowpack at high altitudes, sustain watershed stability and resilience, provide critical habitat for fish and wildlife and supply water-based recreation and other benefits that improve our quality of life. Public concern about adequate supplies of clean water was a major reason for the establishment of a national forest system. American Forests was instrumental in that effort and continues to advocate for sound water policy today.

In celebration of the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act's creation. and to bring awareness to the continuing threats to our water resources, American Forests is proud to be a part of the Clean Water Network's Power of Water Campaign. The campaign aims to bring the nation's attention back to protecting our nation's waters so that our families and communities have clean and safe water to drink and the opportunity to swim, fish and safely enjoy our rivers, lakes and other bodies of water. As part of this effort, American Forests is highlighting the vital role forests play in ensuring we have clean water and the need for the protection and maintenance of forested watersheds.

The goal of the Clean Water Act (CWA) has been to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of our nation's waters. Since the act was passed in 1972, many of our water bodies and waterways are less polluted. Lake Erie, for example, which I was declared "dead" in the 1960s, now supports a multi-million-dollar fishery.

The CWA separates water pollution into two types: point sources and non-point sources. A point source is any "discernible, confined and discrete conveyance from which pollutants are or may be discharged" such as pipes, ditches and wells. Non-point-source pollution is caused by rainfall or snowmelt moving over and through the ground, picking up natural and human-made pollutants and depositing them into lakes, rivers, wetlands, coastal waters and ground waters. In 1970, point-source pollution accounted for 85 percent of the pollutants in our waters and today accounts for only 15 percent. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

American Forests Celebrates the 40th Anniversary of the Clean Water Act
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.