Power to the People's Overseers; Liberals Find New Ways to Enjoy Their Favorite Pastime - Coercion

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

Power to the People's Overseers; Liberals Find New Ways to Enjoy Their Favorite Pastime - Coercion


Byline: Robert Knight, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Liberals love coercion. They think they're smarter than the rest of us. If they didn't, they wouldn't expend so much effort inventing new rules and laws for our betterment.

Just this past week, liberal Democrats imposed the counterfeit of homosexual marriage on the people of Maryland, shot down expanded gun rights in Iowa and defeated an amendment in the U.S. Senate restoring conscience protections against the Obama administration's contraceptive and abortifacient mandate to Catholic hospitals.

They were joined in the latter by moderate Republican Sen. Olympia J. Snowe of Maine, whose announced departure at the end of her term has generated crocodile tears among those whose favorite moderates are Republicans who cave on cue.

In Virginia, liberal Democrats voted to continue to bar home school families from sports teams in public schools that they support with their taxes, and halted a bill to ease the mandated anti-HPV inoculation of young girls. These are the same Democrats who screamed keep your hands off our bodies over a Republican-sponsored law requiring women seeking an abortion to undergo an ultrasound before letting the abortionist kill the baby.

Suddenly, liberals who want to get around parents to inject girls with drugs and to coerce Catholics into funding abortion pills find government coercion, well, a terrible thing. When it comes to abortion, liberals oppose any speed bumps whatsoever, including minimal health regulations imposed on all other medical clinics, and procedures aimed at providing more information to mothers about something as consequential as the gestation of a new human being.

But abortion and the proliferation of obscenity are the grand exceptions. In most other matters, liberals drink enthusiastically from the tap labeled Coercion. They want to regulate everything under the sun, and they'd regulate the sun if they could get their hands on it. Sadly, conservatives who are tempted to use government as a vehicle for compassion sometimes get addicted to the same elixir.

Frustrated by Americans' continued resistance to their benevolent control, liberals a few years ago hit on their grand idea: man-made global warming. It's the ultimate excuse for regulating every human activity and expanding government. It's also another great excuse for promoting abortion and non-procreative alternative lifestyles, because the birth of each human baby is a terrible threat to the environment.

Just to add perspective, this rush to regulate in the name of progress is a relatively new development. The U.S. government, for instance, did not have to issue a crackdown on horse poop and the hay industry to facilitate the mass switch from ol' Dobbin to the Model T.

Likewise, it did not have to punish Ma Bell to get us all off rotary units and onto cellphones. Wait. It did. It broke Ma Bell into seven Baby Bells. I stand corrected. But touch tones and iPhones would have happened anyway because people like them and Steve Jobs needed an outlet for his restless, entrepreneurial energy.

The point is, apart from the space program, which generated lots of technological breakthroughs on the taxpayer's dime before President Obama killed it, government does a lousy job of picking winners and losers compared to the free market. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Power to the People's Overseers; Liberals Find New Ways to Enjoy Their Favorite Pastime - Coercion
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.