2012 Dr. John Hope Franklin Award Winners Selected

By Davis, Crystal D. | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, March 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

2012 Dr. John Hope Franklin Award Winners Selected


Davis, Crystal D., Diverse Issues in Higher Education


Diverse: Issues In Higher Education is pleased to announce the winners of the Dr. John Hope Franklin Award for 2012--longtime San Francisco State University President Robert A. Corrigan and Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles co-founders Gary Orfield and Christopher Edley, Jr., jointly.

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Dr. Corrigan has served as the 12th president of San Francisco State University since September 1988. He previously served nine years as chancellor of the University of Massachusetts at Boston. At both universities, he has made civic engagement and the application of university expertise to community issues a campus hallmark. Earlier in his career, he founded the Afro-American Studies program--one of the nation's first--at the University of Iowa, and published the first full-scale bibliography of Afro-American fiction for this emerging discipline.

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In addition to co-directing the Civil Rights Project, now housed at UCLA, Dr. Orfield is professor of education, law, political science and urban planning at UCLA. Orfield's principal interest is in the development and implementation of social policy, with a focus on the impact of policy on equal opportunity for success in American society. School desegregation and the implementation of civil rights laws have been central issues throughout his career. Orfield has served as an expert witness in several dozen court cases related to his research, including the University of Michigan Supreme Court case which upheld the policy of affirmative action in 2003. …

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