She's Back: Rhee Organization Pushes Legislative Reforms

By Pascopella, Angela | District Administration, March 2012 | Go to article overview

She's Back: Rhee Organization Pushes Legislative Reforms


Pascopella, Angela, District Administration


MICHELLE RHEE IS BACK. RHEE'S grassroots organization, StudentsFirst, metaphorically descended on the state capitol in Alabama last month, ready to persuade state legislators to reform K12 education. With more than one million members, including

parents, grandparents, teachers, principals and policy makers, StudentsFirst advocates for education reforms, via state or federal legislation and policies, that will improve student achievement.

"The wind seems to be at our backs now," says Tim Melton, StudentsFirst's vice president of legislative affairs and a former Michigan state representative. "We're starting to see a majority of the states moving in that direction. Over the last two or three weeks, several governors have taken this head-on. Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, and Washington Gov. Chris Gregoire are realizing this is the right thing to do. We feel it's certainly sweeping the nation and public opinion is behind it. It's almost at the tipping point that this is the norm, not the reform anymore."

50 Policies in Seven States

The focus of the nonprofit, which was created by Rhee in December 2010, is to empower parents, create meaningful teacher evaluations tied to student growth and achievement, and provide quality public school choices. Rhee, chancellor of the District of Columbia Public Schools from 2007 to 2010 and founder of The New Teacher Project, stated in a member conference call last December that in one year of operation, the group helped create 50 legislative policies in seven states that "empower parents, ensure accountability, and elevate good teachers. …

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