More Colleges Testing Students to Measure Learning

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 19, 2012 | Go to article overview

More Colleges Testing Students to Measure Learning


Byline: Washington Post

The accountability movement has arrived in higher education.

Hundreds of colleges are testing freshmen and seniors to measure learning from enrollment to graduation. More than 100 schools have voluntarily published results from new learning assessments, offering parents, prospective students and government regulators a gauge of the value colleges add to the acquisition of knowledge and critical thinking skills.

An article in Thursday's Washington Post recounted the experience of the University of Texas with the Collegiate Learning Assessment over the past eight years. UT students score well on the test, but seniors don't perform much better than freshmen. University leaders have used the findings and other research data to drive improvements in classroom teaching.

The University of Texas system is one of a few higher-education entities that require member institutions to give such tests. Other colleges that give the CLA and two similar tests, the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency and Proficiency Profile, do so on a mostly voluntary basis. Results are not generally made public.

The assessment movement began as a means for institutions to measure the critical thinking and communication skills of their students, as a purely internal exercise.

But the conversation shifted dramatically last year, when sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa used CLA results to critique American higher education. After giving the test at 24 public and private colleges, they concluded that only 36 percent of students showed significant learning gains between freshman and senior years.

College leaders are divided on the merits of the assessments. Many schools have embraced the tests as one tool among several to measure student outcomes.

"I thought it was a revelation," said Jeff Abernathy, president of Alma College, a liberal arts school in Michigan. "It's hard data about student learning across all the disciplines of higher education."

Several years ago, the Council of Independent Colleges organized a consortium of private schools to administer the CLA and share findings. At its peak, 57 institutions participated, said Richard Ekman, the council's president. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

More Colleges Testing Students to Measure Learning
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.