Newsmakers


Voice From the Grave: Whitney Houston couldn't save herself, but she sure saved Oprah. The mogul's interview with Houston's grieving family helped resuscitate OWN, Winfrey's flagging cable network. Oprah was at her talk-show best, whipping the affair into one of her perfectly orchestrated, quasi-religious experiences. Houston's relatives attempted to put a bright spin on the singer's death and her addictions. "Things were really changing," sister-in-law Patricia said. A true statement, at least, for OWN: 3.5 million watched the special, the channel's biggest ratings bonanza ever. Says one entertainment source who worked with Houston: "I would not have advised her family to do that interview. The whole thing just seemed odd. But it was good for Oprah."

A Rousing Revenge: Reproductive rights is serious stuff, but one Ohio woman is having the last laugh. Nina Turner, a 44-year-old state senator, is pushing a new bill that would make Viagra prescriptions as difficult to come by as abortions. "For far too long, female policymakers have abdicated our responsibilities to protect men's sexual health," she deadpans to Newsweek. Turner thinks men should submit to cardiac stress tests and go to counseling where they discuss their, um, progress with the little blue pill. Though aging lotharios may quake at Turner's proposal, at least one fellow appears to be on board: her husband. "He understands this is about equality," she says.

Losing Bet: Luck ran out for HBO's much-hyped horse-racing drama: the network abruptly canceled the show last week, sending Dustin Hoffman and Nick Nolte to the unemployment line. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Newsmakers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.