On Kawara: DAVID ZWIRNER

By O'Neill-Butler, Lauren | Artforum International, March 2012 | Go to article overview

On Kawara: DAVID ZWIRNER


O'Neill-Butler, Lauren, Artforum International


This year, On Kawara will enter his eighth decade of being still alive. For more than half his life, he has been producing the rigidly formulaic " ibday" paintings, his most enduring body of work. The series remains key (and is the earliest) among the diari/ing projects he began between the mid-1960s and the early '70s--from the cryptic, deadpan telegrams that broadcast the quotidian facts of his life or confirmed his continuing existence ("I Am Still Alive," 1970-ca. 2005) to the postcards that announce when he rose from bed ("I Got Up/1 1968-79), Now numbering in the thousands, the "Today" canvases each display the date of their creation in white, sans-serif font on a monochrome ground. The artist eschews personal details yet allows the viewer to trace his location at different points in time, since the dates are rendered according to the dating conventions and language of the country in which the painting was made.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"Date Painting(s) in New York and 136 Other Cities," presented more than 150 entries from "Today." One wing of the gallery hosted canvases created in New York City, these in an assortment of colors and sizes, their dates commencing January 4, 1966, and continuing into 2012, with new ones added during the course of the exhibition; another wing offered a selection of date paintings made in other cities, all much smaller, at five by seven inches. (Painting at this scale was a requirement of working on the road: Kawara needed to transport the works home.) The canvases' varying colors--red and blue, but mostly black--proved to be the most eye-catching aspect of the show, the capricious choice of color always creating a compelling friction against Kawara's rigid format and the self-imposed rule that each work must be finished before midnight or be destroyed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

On Kawara: DAVID ZWIRNER
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.