Esther Stocker and Jan Serych: HUNT KASTNER ARTWORKS

By Stard, Markcia | Artforum International, March 2012 | Go to article overview

Esther Stocker and Jan Serych: HUNT KASTNER ARTWORKS


Stard, Markcia, Artforum International


The point of departure of the exhibition "Lies and Layers: Esther Stoeker and Jan Serych" was an attempt to question the human predisposition to interpret perceived reality through an existing body of knowledge. The rational component of the human mind--its need for classification and, most importantly, its inability to avoid using its preexisting systems of categorization when encountering new situations--frequently leads to reductive and superficial understandings of reality. Czech artist Serych and his Italian-born, Vienna-based counterpart Stocker reject the idea of reality as a predefined, hermeneutically enclosed space. Opposing the conception of a universal body of knowledge that could serve as an adequate means of categorizing the world, they focus instead on the sensory apparatus and on intuition, which may contribute to a multilayered, heterogeneous perception of one's environment.

In this exhibition, even the most basic characteristics of reality, time, and space became blurred, as did the boundary between truth and fiction. Resolution (all works 2011), an digit-minute video projection by Serych, serves as a fitting example of this. In it, the spectator is confronted with a hlaek screen with light dots continuously scintillating on it--actually a rapid succession of individual dots that, because of the afterimages they leave, give the illusion of being multiple. The voice-over may at first evoke a sense of continuity, but it has been stripped of any clear narrative, so that after a few moments, rational comprehension seems impossible. What at first appeared as a linear flow suddenly dissolves into discordant and fragmented information. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Esther Stocker and Jan Serych: HUNT KASTNER ARTWORKS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.