Looking Locally

By Bacon, Peter | Harvard International Review, Spring 2012 | Go to article overview

Looking Locally


Bacon, Peter, Harvard International Review


In "Beneficial War" from the previous issue, US Army Colonel Gian Gentile argued that counterinsurgency (COIN), the military doctrine for American efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan by which American forces work to build security and governance in occupied territory, has largely failed. Gentile argues that the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have remained unaffected by COIN, yet the doctrine has monopolized Army strategy and planning. This has forced politicians to accede to militarist commanders and threatened to transform our military-industrial complex for the worse.

However, Gentile does not properly classify COIN operations in both Iraq and Afghanistan, and gives too much credit to it as a doctrine dominating discussions in Washington. In fact, the Army has failed to hilly embrace counterinsurgency, a failure that is reflected in our faltering efforts in Afghanistan. More importantly, the Army faces a domestic and international political environment in which traditional ground warfare has become increasingly obsolescent.

Counterinsurgency as defined by Colonel Gentile does not appropriately reflect the full spectrum of counterinsurgency. Whenever possible, counterinsurgency places the onus of operations on local forces, with American forces primarily serving in an advisory capacity. However, American forces in Iraq and Afghanistan typically conducted operations either alone or using a token indigenous contingent to aid in their operations. By paying only lip service to enabling local forces to combat the insurgency, Americans bore the brunt of the fighting and prevented local forces from gaining experience and legitimacy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Looking Locally
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.