What If Taft Came Back?

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 26, 2012 | Go to article overview

What If Taft Came Back?


Byline: Wes Vernon, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Let your imagination run wild: What if President William Howard Taft suddenly disappeared nearly 100 years ago on his way out the White House door and was resurrected (as certified by scientists) in 2012?

That fantasy would leave intact his previous life's accomplishments as an educator, solicitor general, holder of two judgeships, governor-general of the Philippines and, of course, president for four years.

In Taft 2012, Taft's nine years (1921-1930) as chief justice of the United States are necessarily omitted because they occurred during the 100 years of his mysterious absence.

No small matter, given that a seat on the high court was his ultimate ambition. (Yes, even more than the presidency, which he had little interest in seeking. The Republican Party and his ambitious wife, Nellie, persuaded Taft to go for the White House.)

Even minus the Supreme Court years, the rest of Taft's distinguished career is ample grist for a fictitious mill of speculation as to how our 27th president would view 21st-century America.

However, speculative fiction such as this would do well at least to present its main character in a way that comports with the historical record. Otherwise, what's the point? Why not just write fiction?

Yes, a returned William Howard Taft likely would be heartened that black people occupy prominent positions in the U.S. mainstream, including that a black American could ascend to his old job at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, however horrifying he would find the substance of President Obama's worldview.

However, if William Howard Taft were back with us in 2012, is it not logical that his interest in the 2012 presidential race would transcend the relatively incidental focus Taft 2012 accords it? Would he not trade barbs with the candidates?

What about same-sex marriage? Abortion? A mandate that every citizen purchase health insurance? Would not Taft, whose brilliant legal mind made him a stickler for the law and the Constitution, have something to say about these suddenly discovered constitutional rights ? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

What If Taft Came Back?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.