The Muppet Family Tree; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS

Daily Mail (London), March 28, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Muppet Family Tree; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS


Byline: Compiled by Charles Legge

QUESTION How many Muppets did Jim Henson create?

JIM HENSON (1936-90) was a veritable font of ideas who created wonderful creatures and characters, stories, songs and imagery. His creativity is best celebrated in The Muppet Show, which ran for 120 episodes between 1976 and 1981.

It was an amazing blend of vaudeville, musical comedy and slapstick in the form of a live action puppet show and featured a remarkable roster of celebrity guests such as Elton John, Alice Cooper, Julie Andrews, Liza Minnelli, John Cleese, Steve Martin, Peter Sellers and Roger Moore.

Regular characters included Kermit the Frog, Miss Piggy, Fozzie Bear, The Great Gonzo, Rowlf, Animal, Scooter, Statler and Waldorf, but a host of incidental characters would pop up just once or in only a few episodes.

Michael Dixon, an American Muppet fan who founded a now-defunct website Kermitage, listed all the Muppets that appeared in the show and came up with 421 characters or groups of Muppets that had turned up in the original series.

The 'groups' include the likes of Abe and Bernie (a pair of pigs), Alfredo and Hildegard (The Mop Dancers), The Australians (who walked on the ceiling), The Babies, the Baby Koozebanian Creatures, the Bats, The Bouncing Borcellino Brothers (six acrobat pigs), the Bug band, Muppet Furniture and Singing Food.

This means Henson created more than 500 individual Muppets for the show -- but if you take all the shows from Henson's Muppet Empire, the number is far higher.

The Count, webmaster of muppetcentral.com, collated a list of all the Muppets in the following Henson productions, including: The Junior Morning Show, in which the very first Muppet characters, Longhorn, Shorthorn and Pierre the French Rat, appeared in 1954.

Henson also created CityKids, Tales Of The Tinkerdee and The Land Of Tinkerdee, Little Muppet Monsters, The Land Of Gorch, The Hoobs, Panwapa, Telling Stories With Tomie DePaola, Puppetman, Dog City, Sam & Friends, The Great Santa Claus Switch, The Ghost Of Faffner Hall and Tales From Muppetland.

Then there are Mother Goose Stories, Bear In The Big Blue House, Jim Henson's Animal Show, Muppets Tonight, The Jim Henson Hour, Mopatop's Shop, Fraggle Rock, The Muppet Show and Sesame Street. And all these are quite apart from miscellaneous educational videos he made.

So for these shows Henson created an impressive 3,258 Muppets. The figure does not, however, include puppets featured in various Henson movies, such as The Dark Crystal and Labyrinth -- but only because Henson did not regard these characters as Muppets.

Jerry Talent, Los Angeles.

QUESTION How did Daniel Fahrenheit create a scale with 32 degrees for the freezing point of water and 212 for its boiling point?

FURTHER to the earlier answer, although the French Jesuit Jean Leurechon (1593-1670) didn't coin the term 'thermometer' until 1624, the instrument had been around some years before, and many consider Galileo's open thermometer of 1592 to be the first.

It was from this period on that demand grew for a sensible calibration scale, although many suggestions were arbitrary. For instance, Francesco Sagredo (1571-1620) designated the upper fixed point on his scale as that of 'the greatest heat of a summer's day'.

In 1701, Isaac Newton (1642-1727) suggested the temperature of melting ice as a zero point and as a second fixed point 'the armpit temperature of a healthy Englishman'. On this 'armpit scale' the boiling point of water was 34c.

Towering genius though Newton was, there is no doubt that Fahrenheit's scale was more rigorous. In 1742 Anders Celsius (1701-1744) proposed his 100-point scale, although he proposed that the boiling point of water should be designated as 0 degrees Celsius.

This was sensibly inverted by Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778, inventor of the binomial system of nomenclature) in 1745 to give us the universal scale of temperature used today. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Muppet Family Tree; ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.