Massive Land Lockup Threatens Nuclear Future; Salazar Exceeded His Authority in Banning Uranium Mining on 1 Million Acres

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 3, 2012 | Go to article overview

Massive Land Lockup Threatens Nuclear Future; Salazar Exceeded His Authority in Banning Uranium Mining on 1 Million Acres


Byline: William Perry Pendley, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

President Obama's commitment to all of the above energy development apparently does not include nuclear power in light of a January order issued by Interior Secretary Kenneth L. Salazar. The edict locks up 1 million acres of federal land in northwestern Arizona that holds the nation's highest-grade uranium ore. That is according to lawsuits filed in a federal district court in Arizona by two mining groups - the Northwest Mining Association of Spokane, Wash., and the National Mining Association of Washington, D.C., allied with the Nuclear Energy Institute - challenging the legality and the constitutionality of the order. The Arizona Strip, which lies north of the Colorado River in northern Arizona, is bordered to the south by the northern rim of Grand Canyon National Park. In the Arizona Wilderness Act of 1984, Congress designated 250,000 acres of federal land on or near the Arizona Strip as wilderness and released 600,000 acres of land in the same area for multiple use, including uranium mining, as a result of a historic compromise among environmental groups, uranium mining interests, the livestock industry and others. It was that compromise that permitted exploration for domestic sources of uranium. In fact, according to the U.S. Geological Survey, lands withdrawn by Mr. Salazar's order contain uranium that, if mined to capacity, would generate sufficient electricity to power Los Angeles for 154 years.

Researchers say the United States must develop domestic sources of uranium in the face of higher prices and increased global demand. America is more than 90 percent dependent on foreign sources of uranium to fuel the 104 nuclear reactors that provide power for 1 in 5 American homes and businesses. A major source of U.S. imports is uranium from dismantled Russian warheads; however, the agreement under which the U.S. purchases that uranium expires in 2013.

There is a global supply shortfall of about 40 million pounds of uranium per year that comes from existing stockpiles. …

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