Hy We Must Strike Iran; Ts Complicity in Sept. 11 Demonstrates the Danger of a Nuclear Nemesis

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 4, 2012 | Go to article overview

Hy We Must Strike Iran; Ts Complicity in Sept. 11 Demonstrates the Danger of a Nuclear Nemesis


Byline: Adm. James A. Lyons, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Islamic fundamentalist regime in Iran has been at war with the United States for more than 30 years, but every administration from President Jimmy Carter's to the current one has tried to ignore it. Currently, the Obama administration is wrestling with the issue of Iran's drive to achieve nuclear weapons capability. The question of what we should do about it really becomes moot, since we now have clear evidence of Iran's direct involvement and support of al Qaeda before and after the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Evidence indicates Iran, Hezbollah and al Qaeda made an alliance in the 1990s.

On Dec. 22, 2011, U.S. District Judge George B. Daniels in New York ruled that Iran and Hezbollah provided both material and direct support to al Qaeda in the Sept. 11 attacks against the United States. Part of the convincing evidence was provided by three Iranian defectors from Iran's intelligence agency, the Ministry of Information and Security and the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps.

One of the defectors, Abolghasem Mesbahi, a former Ministry of Information and Security operative in charge of Iran's espionage operations in Western Europe, testified that he was part of a joint task force with the Revolutionary Guard Corps that designed contingency plans for unconventional warfare against the United States, code name Shaitan dar Atash (Satan in the Flames). These plans included crashing hijacked airliners into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and the White House. During the summer of 2001, Mesbahi stated that he received three coded messages indicating that the plan had been activated.

Mesbahi also testified that, in 2000, Iran used front companies to obtain a Boeing flight simulator for training the Sept. 11 hijackers. Evidence from the 9/11 Commission Report that a senior Hezbollah operative, Imad Mughniyah (terror chief) coordinated activities of the hijackers in Saudi Arabia, where they were provided passports with special markings so that they could proceed to and through Iran without having their passports stamped en route to Afghanistan. Unanswered questions include who provided the special Saudi passports? How did the Iranian border guards know what to look for? Was it a conspiracy?

Regretfully, the evidence presented to Judge Daniels was not the result of U.S. government or congressional committee investigation but by private attorneys and witnesses representing the families of the Sept. 11 victims. By way of background, just one week before the 9/11 Commission sent its final report to the printers in July 2004, a six-page National Security Agency analysis summarizing what the intelligence community had learned about Iran's direct involvement in the attacks was found in the last box of classified documents they were reviewing.

This information was so devastating in implicating Iran's role in the Sept. 11 attacks that the CIA tried to get it expunged from the final 9/11 Commission Report. …

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