Obama's Pipeline to Nowhere; Ending Keystone XL in Oklahoma Symbolizes Shortsighted Energy Policy

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

Obama's Pipeline to Nowhere; Ending Keystone XL in Oklahoma Symbolizes Shortsighted Energy Policy


Byline: H. Leighton Steward, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

President Obama is slowly walking back his decision to nix the Keystone XL oil pipeline after weathering significant backlash from unions, pro-business groups and the public. But rather than green light the critical infrastructure project linking Canadian oil with American refineries, Mr. Obama has struck a truly astonishing compromise sure to please no one: a pipeline to nowhere. The $7 billion, 1,700-mile Keystone XL pipeline would connect the oil sands of Alberta, Canada, with American refineries on the Gulf Coast. Mr. Obama rejected the project in January to placate environmental extremists who fear an increased release of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) will cause a climate change catastrophe, a theory that just doesn't hold up in the face of empirical evidence.

His move backfired as unions - typically allies of the president - and pro-business groups slammed the decision while Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper wasted no time in signaling Canada would look elsewhere, particularly China, to sell its oil. In fact, PetroChina has now surpassed ExxonMobil in crude oil production. China's leaders are buying oil and securing rights to new production while the Obama administration shuns new supplies.

Realizing that he's making more enemies than friends with his decision, Mr. Obama now hopes to placate his opponents by allowing construction of the pipeline from the Gulf Coast to - wait for it - Oklahoma. That's about 1,200 miles short of the Canadian oil sands. The decision is already drawing criticism from all sides as Republicans are rightfully calling it an empty half-measure while environmental extremists accuse the president of caving to special interests.

Mr. Obama announced his pipeline to nowhere during his energy-policy roadshow designed to help shield him from the effects of rising gas prices his advisers fear will harm his re-election bid. That roadshow highlights the Obama administration's mixed bag of solar-panel programs, subsidized green jobs and gifts to climate-change alarmists.

It's not unusual to hear defenders complain that the president doesn't set energy prices. He doesn't set them but it's ludicrous to pretend the president's actions and policies don't have a strong influence on energy prices and therefore, he shouldn't share blame when they go up. Mr. Obama has done everything in his power to shake the energy markets and spur the rise in prices at the pump. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Obama's Pipeline to Nowhere; Ending Keystone XL in Oklahoma Symbolizes Shortsighted Energy Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.