Olbermann like '$10 Million Chandelier'? Fragile and Vastly Overpriced, Oft-Fired Commentator Won't Go Away Quietly

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

Olbermann like '$10 Million Chandelier'? Fragile and Vastly Overpriced, Oft-Fired Commentator Won't Go Away Quietly


Byline: Patrick Hruby, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

On initial review, the metaphor sounded ridiculous. There was Keith Olbermann, fired from his much-hyped, short-lived gig on Current TV, speaking with David Letterman on Tuesday night, characteristically bombastic in a televised mea sorta culpa.

It's my fault that it didn't succeed in the sense that I didn't think the whole thing through, Mr. Olbermann said on CBS' Late Show, discussing his dismissal from the avowedly liberal cable network less than a year into a five-year, $50 million contract.

I didn't say, 'You know, if you buy a $10 million chandelier, you should have a house to put it in. Just walking around with a $10 million chandelier isn't going to do anybody a lot of good, and it's not going to do any good to the chandelier.

You're the chandelier? Mr. Letterman asked.

Yes, Mr. Olbermann replied.

And there you have it: Keith Olbermann, television's Samson Self-Agonistes, an Anchor Without a Desk, likening himself to an ultra-luxe, too-precious household decoration. In a fridge full of Duff beer, I am the Cristal!

The immodest, self-serving comparison prompted a series of snarky Twitter bon mots: OLBERMANN CHANDELIER now available at Ikea, wrote television writer and Vanity Fair magazine contributor Nell Scovell. Combine with POMPaS DINING TABLE and SMaGG CHAIRS.

Keith Olbermann says he's a 10 million dollar chandelier, wrote Warren Holstein, a New York City-based standup comedian. Mitt Romney offers to buy him, hang him and turn him off.

Fragile? wrote conservative commentator S.E. Cupp.

Ms. Cupp is on to something. While Mr. Olbermann's statement sounds ridiculous, it actually makes a lot of sense. Consider:

Chandeliers look down from above: No matter who is in the room - presidents and kings, diplomats and oligarchs, Las Vegas convention attendees and high school kids on prom night - chandeliersforever dangle overhead, superior to one and all. Much like Mr. Olbermann, whose condescending, sanctimonious broadcasting style is best encapsulated by his signature, how-dare-YOU-sir Special Comments - most notably one in which he took New York City Mayor Michael R. …

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