Military Policy Led to Attack on Civilians

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 7, 2012 | Go to article overview

Military Policy Led to Attack on Civilians


Military policy led to attack on civilians

About the March shooting in Afghanistan, I feel this incident is not a case of one "bad apple" but the effect of a continued U.S. military policy of drone strikes, night raids and helicopter attacks in which Afghan civilians pay the price. I hope the Kandahar massacre will be a turning point in the war. I am condemning the massacre and calling for an end to our occupation in Afghanistan.

Paul Allodi

Schaumburg

There's plenty right about news media

I am writing in response to Al Haak's complaint (Fence Post, March 24) that the news media do not give equal coverage to President Obama's "gaffes." I have to point out that unless Mr. Haak attended each event where the president made the "gaffes" he listed, I suspect he learned about them through "The Media."

Yes, there is bias in some media organizations, but let's agree to let go of the canard that there is some kind of left-wing conspiracy throughout all of the media in this country. Ten minutes of Fox News or Rush Limbaugh should cure you of that.

Paul Snead

Mount Prospect

Tax cuts for wealthy led to huge deficits

It is absolutely amazing to me that the talking heads on Fox News can get so many Americans to believe trying to raise top marginal tax rates to increase revenues is "redistribution of wealth" and "class warfare." The fact is we have always had a progressive federal income tax system that taxes higher income individuals at a larger percentage thereby insuring the upper-income people would always pay the majority of federal taxes. However the top marginal tax rate used to be over 90 percent in the 1960s and was still 70 percent in 1980. Clearly, 90 percent was too high a tax rate, but when Reagan lowered the top rate to 28 percent that was obviously too low.

Reagan's OMB director, David Stockman, has come out stating these low rates led to large deficits and contributed greatly to today's huge debt. Clinton raised this top rate to 39.6 percent, and budgets were balanced, large surpluses were projected, and the economy was clearly not negatively affected (proven by the fact that our longest economic expansion in history was from 1993-2001).

The Bush tax cuts of 2001 and 2003 reversed these trends and again led to large deficits. These tax cuts also led to the fact that many Americans pay no federal income taxes today (although Republicans would have you believe that was President Obama's doing). Bush's Treasury secretaries, Paul O'Neill and Hank Paulson, have now agreed taxes (and revenues) must be raised.

The Republican tax cuts of the last 30 years also led to the fact that the truly wealthy (those with after-tax incomes over $25 million) have seen their incomes increase 600 percent while middle class incomes have been relatively stagnant. Now that's what I call redistribution of wealth!

Phil Williams

Palatine

We need a higher power to guide us

Mr. Robert Harrison, this is in response to your March 24 argument that supports use of contraceptive methods and debates the Catholic Church's unwillingness to sanction these methods.

Your argument, while wordy, can be narrowed to "everyone is doing it, so why doesn't the church accept what everyone is doing?" I find this thinking similar to the adage about jumping off the bridge because everyone else is. …

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Military Policy Led to Attack on Civilians
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