News Media Biases Go Both Ways

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 11, 2012 | Go to article overview

News Media Biases Go Both Ways


News media biases go both ways

I would agree with Mr. Jim Slusher that there was nothing particularly wrong with the photos of Rep. Joe Walsh (Letter to Readers column, April 5). He went on to explain that the type of people who might complain about this would be those "who often superimpose their own prejudices on what the read and see in the paper."

I guess he decided to use his own words and ideas to prove his point in the remainder of his column. I found it amusing that an editor would use phrases like "a certain segment of the population," "encouraged by a top all-news cable outlet," "fallen prey to a propaganda strategy" and "broadcast bloviators" when he could have simply written "conservatives who watch FOX."

He referred to the idea that there is a strong liberal bias in a large segment of the media as a "tired clich" and a "gross misrepresentation." Mr. Slusher went on to say he had to address this because he could not "let the propagandists win" with regard to the "outrageous assertions about the media's motives."

So I guess the bottom line from Mr. Slusher is any thought that there is a liberal media bias is a totally fabricated piece of propaganda pushed by FOX News.

I guess people do more than superimpose their prejudices on what they read, sometimes they expose their prejudices with what they write.

Let's be real, there is bias going in both directions in today's news media, and consumers are free to choose which source they want to read, see or listen to. To pretend anything else is disingenuous, especially for an op-ed page editor. …

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