Book Reviews

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), April 12, 2012 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews


SLAVE GIRL by Jackie French Slave Girl is set in the Viking era about a poor girl named Hekja with a talent for writing songs and singing, she is about 13. Hekja lives by the sea and near the mountains.

One day, when all the oldest girls of each family are up on a hill making cheese, Viking longboats are seen approaching by the village. The other girls were too afraid to warn the village but Hekja, even though very frightened, sprints down to alert the villagers. She reaches her mum just in time to see her murdered by a large Viking (Finibogi).

Hekja runs in terror only to be captured by Freydis, a female Viking who wields power, SAPPHIRE BATTERSEA by Jacqueline Wilson This is the second book in the soon-to-be Hetty Feather trilogy. Hetty is a Victorian foundling girl. She has been raised to be a maid (not that this pleases her) and has made friends and enemies along the way.

This red-haired girl doesn't let anything get her down.

Hetty is the happiest she's ever been. She has found out her true mother is her favourite cook, and she has a wonderful new name, Sapphire Battersea.

a as But when someone blew her secret she realised she might never see her mother again. Not long after, she is sent to be a maid and makes lots of new friends. Will Sapphire ever see her mother again? Will she be able to keep her job? And what fate is in store for Sapphire? This is a great book for girls aged 11 to 14 by Jacqueline Wilson and I can't wait to read the third and final installment of the trilogy in September!

Lilith Allen, Year 7 pupil at Kenton School, Newcastle. …

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