Law Change Doesn't Affect Current Inmates; Georgia's Revision to Criminal Justice Laws Reduces Some Sentences

By Jones, Walter C. | The Florida Times Union, April 10, 2012 | Go to article overview

Law Change Doesn't Affect Current Inmates; Georgia's Revision to Criminal Justice Laws Reduces Some Sentences


Jones, Walter C., The Florida Times Union


Byline: Walter C. Jones

ATLANTA | Despite the back slapping and congratulations about unanimous support in the General Assembly for revision to the criminal justice laws, the new legislation awaiting the governor's signature has no impact on the tens of thousands of Georgians behind bars.

"The answer to the question 'Will it do anything for people already in prison?' is almost completely 'no,' " said Sara Totonchi, policy director for the Southern Center for Human Rights.

The bill will reduce sentences for low-dollar thefts, forgery, burglary and small-time drug offenses committed after it becomes law. People already convicted must serve out the sentences for the law they broke at the time, not the new one, experts say.

The original draft of the measure, House Bill 1176, did include a provision that would have moved those with long sentences to probation six months before their release to ease their transition to society. The 13-member commission that authored the basis for HB 1176 recommended it.

NO SUPERVISION

In 2010, 7,495 offenders who were paroled had no supervision to follow, the commission's November report said.

Among that number, 1,592 also had no probation supervision to follow meaning they were freed without any supervision, the report said.

"These offenders include serious and even some chronic offenders, and by requiring that offenders serve time on parole, parole officers can provide supervision while these offenders transition back into the community," the report said.

The commission also advised rewarding offenders for good behavior by reducing their probation.

"We did not see any of those make it to the finish line in this bill," Totonchi said.

Both the transition and the rewards are missing from the version sitting on Gov. Nathan Deal's desk. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Law Change Doesn't Affect Current Inmates; Georgia's Revision to Criminal Justice Laws Reduces Some Sentences
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.