Field Notes

By Jefferies, Cameron | Health Law Review, Spring 2012 | Go to article overview

Field Notes


Jefferies, Cameron, Health Law Review


The Health Law Institute has co-sponsored two mental health conferences with the Alberta Mental Health Patient Advocate Office. The second such conference, titled "Giving Voice 2: Advocacy & Mental Health", took place on May 24 and enabled participants to interact with leaders in the area of mental health advocacy, government, and justice. This conference served as a forum for learning, discussion and education on recent advances in mental health and the law.

Recent history has witnessed many important moments in the development of mental health advocacy in Canada. In 2006, the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology (chaired by The Honourable Michael J. L. Kirby) released the report titled "Out of the Shadows at Last: Transforming Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addiction Services in Canada" (the Report). Amongst many key recommendations and observations, section 16.1.3 of the Report affirmed the necessity of creating a Mental Health Commission of Canada (the Commission), and suggested that its creation "heralds new era in mental health in Canada". After receiving financial support from the Federal government, the Commission registered as a non-profit corporation in March 2007, and the Government of Canada named Former Senator Michael J. L. Kirby as the Commission's first Chair.

This rejuvenated effort to address mental health concerns has continued to expand. In addition to the Federal commitment to this issue, Provincial and Territorial governments across Canada are starting to act and make improved mental health care a priority. In this special edition of the Health Law Review, readers have the opportunity to experience the sort of informative and educational experience that participants in our last mental health conference enjoyed.

In "The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Beginning to Examine the Implications for Canadian Lawyers' Professional Responsibilities", Archibald Kaiser discusses how members of the legal community should self-reflect on the diverse measures contained in the Convention and consider how these obligations impact their practice. The author asserts that the complex legal system is one way in which the division between those with mental illness and those without is amplified, and suggests that by incorporating the principles from the Convention into professional regulation, the bar can assist in reducing this divide. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Field Notes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.