At Long Last Science Proves Bisexuality

The Mirror (London, England), May 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

At Long Last Science Proves Bisexuality


Byline: Miriam Stoppard

* have always thought that bisexuality is a normal sexual orientation, which itself can be pretty changeable given the circumstances you find yourself in.

So, for instance, even though you may be wholly hetero, if you find yourself in the sole company of the same gender you could find yourself veering to same gender sex.

This could apply to both men and women who are in prison, in the armed forces, in nunneries and monasteries and in single-gender schools. This is because our sexuality isn't fixed in stone, it's on a sliding scale.

There would be 100% homosexuality at one end of the scale, and 100% heterosexuality at the other and somewhere in the middle would be those who are happy swinging both ways.

So far so good. Except that men who claim to be bisexual (the research on women hasn't been done yet) haven't been accepted either by scientists or by people whose sexual orientation is less equivocal.

According to strict scientific criteria it remained to be shown that bisexuality exists, up to this point. A new study published online looked at men who are aroused by women as well as men who have had sexual experience with at least two people of each gender, and a romantic relationship of at least three months with at least one person of each gender. …

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