The Road Less Traveled: Case Analysis of the Intersections of Infrastructure Improvement Expenditures

By Rosemond, Daniel | Public Management, May 2012 | Go to article overview

The Road Less Traveled: Case Analysis of the Intersections of Infrastructure Improvement Expenditures


Rosemond, Daniel, Public Management


It goes without saying that in the midst of the most severe economic downturn since the Great Depression, the value of the U.S. dollar has never been lower. Table 1 shows changes in prices ot all goods and services purchased for consumption by urban households. The rate of inflation has been calculated since 1913.

TABLE 1. Inflation in the United States, 1913-2008.

Year  Amount It Took to Equal $1.00 in 1913

1913                                  $1.00

1920                                  $2.02

1925                                  $1.77

1930                                  $1.69

1935                                  $1.38

1940                                  $1.41

1945                                  $1.82

1950                                  $2.43

1955                                  $2.71

1960                                  $2.99

1965                                  $3.18

1970                                  $3.92

1975                                  $5.43

1980                                  $8.32

1985                                 $10.87

1990                                 $13.20

1995                                 $15.39

2000                                 $17.39

2001                                 $17.89

2002                                 $18.17

2003                                 $18.59

2004                                 $19.08

2005                                 $19.73

2006                                 $20.18

2007                                 $20.94

2008                                 $21.57

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor,
database. http://stats.bls.gov.

IN 2008, FOR EXAMPLE, it took $21.57 to buy what $1.00 bought in 1913. Note that in 1920 this number was $2.02, and then it declined in 1925, a decline that persisted during the 1930s, showing the effect of the Great Depression when prices slumped. Prices did not pass $2.00 again until 1950.

The attention given to the use of tax dollars by the government has arguably never been as high profile and newsworthy as it is today. Every line item and expenditure is being questioned, and rightfully so. After all, taxes are the monetary means by which the provision of public services is attained.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Therefore, when tax dollars are used to fund a project that is used by a limited number of individuals, it can be argued that a public good is not being provided.

Background

The project area in this case is composed of private subdivisions developed in the mid-1970s. Like many similar residential areas, these subdivisions were developed with the understanding that they would be self-managed through the vehicle of homeowner associations (HOAs).

The project area, part of Miami Gardens, Florida, is in excess of 220 acres of land, and it comprises three neighborhoods. Ii is noteworthy that many of the residential units in these neighborhoods are multifamily or townhouse units, comprising more than 2,000 households.

As in many suburban developments of this kind, the housing units were clustered together for a maximum unit-to-acre ratio. Although the roads were built to sufficient width to accommodate vehicular traffic, they did not meet required traffic standards to be considered a public right-of-way. These standards would also require appropriate drainage systems.

Also excluded in the original development was street lighting along most of the residential streets. Sidewalks in these subdivisions are also sparse. The roads within the project area function more as alleys than as public streets. Nevertheless, they are the only access--both pedestrian and vehicular--to the housing units in these neighborhoods.

The drastic decline of the housing market has not only affected real estate values but has also financially crippled many HOAs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Road Less Traveled: Case Analysis of the Intersections of Infrastructure Improvement Expenditures
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.