NLC Files Amicus Brief in Arizona Immigration Law Supreme Court Case, Stresses Immigration as a Federal Responsibility

By Minchak, Gregory | Nation's Cities Weekly, April 30, 2012 | Go to article overview

NLC Files Amicus Brief in Arizona Immigration Law Supreme Court Case, Stresses Immigration as a Federal Responsibility


Minchak, Gregory, Nation's Cities Weekly


Immigration policy is a federal responsibility and should remain so. That's the message NLC and dozens of cities sent to the Supreme Court last week as it heard oral arguments in State of Arizona v. United States, which challenges the authority of the state of Arizona to enact its own immigration law, SB1070.

"It is important that the federal government, on behalf of the nation, adopt a comprehensive immigration policy that advances the highest and best interests of all residents," said NLC Executive Director Donald J. Borut.

Under SB1070, which became law in 2010, local law enforcement officers are required to investigate individuals' immigration status, detain all arrestees until their immigration status is verified, and enforce state laws that criminalize both the failure to carry registration documents and any attempt by an undocumented resident to apply for or perform work in the state.

NLC, in an amicus brief joined by the U.S. Conference of Mayors and more than 40 municipalities from across the country, including Phoenix, Flagstaff, Tucson and San Luis, Ariz., argues that allowing states to create their own immigration enforcement policies will detract from local public safety priorities and stretch already limited resources. SB 1070 effectively requires local law enforcement to spend considerable time and money detaining individuals who may eventually not even be charged with a crime, while researching their immigration status.

The law also creates an unreasonable burden on law enforcement to enforce an unworkable law. If a city chooses, for whatever reason, not to enforce the law to its fullest extent, then it may be sued by any resident of the state. Localities also risk depleting resources defending themselves from a surge of lawsuits contending that arrestees were stopped using constitutionally questionable tactics, like racial profiling. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

NLC Files Amicus Brief in Arizona Immigration Law Supreme Court Case, Stresses Immigration as a Federal Responsibility
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.