Obama Denies 'Bloated Government'; Data Contradict Assertion, Show Increase in Federal Employees

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

Obama Denies 'Bloated Government'; Data Contradict Assertion, Show Increase in Federal Employees


Byline: Dave Boyer and Seth McLaughlin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

After presiding over three consecutive years of trillion-dollar deficits, President Obama told an audience in New York on Tuesday not to believe critics who accuse him of running a bloated government.

The only time government employment has gone down during a recession has been under me, Mr. Obama said at a high-tech manufacturing center in Albany. I make that point just so you don't buy into that whole 'bloated government' argument that you hear.

Actually, data compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that federal employment has risen under Mr. Obama. When he took office in January 2009, there were about 2,064,000 federal workers, excluding the Postal Service. Last month, there were 2,202,400 such federal employees, an increase of 6.7 percent.

Including postal workers, overall federal employment has risen from 2,792,000 to 2,821,000 since January 2009.

The president's claim about government employment is correct when factoring in state and local government jobs, which have been hit hardest by the recession. State governments have lost about 100,000 workers during his presidency, and local governments have lost nearly a half-million more.

Meanwhile Tuesday, presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney attacked the Obama administration on exactly the charge Mr. Obama was denying - that he has revived a strain of old-school liberalism that puts its brand of politics far to the left of former President Bill Clinton.

President Clinton said the era of big government was over. President Obama brought it back with a vengeance, Mr. Romney said in an address at Lansing Community College in Michigan, where he attempted to cast Mr. Obama as an out-of-touch radical.

President Clinton made efforts to reform welfare as we knew it, he said, referring to the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act that Mr. Clinton signed in 1996. President Obama is trying tirelessly to expand the welfare state to all Americans, with promises of more programs, more benefits and more spending.

Having all but sewed up his party's nomination, Mr. Romney is basically holding daily campaign stops while barnstorming the nation raising money for his general election campaign against Mr. Obama.

The president used his own Tuesday speech to criticize congressional Republicans for not going along with his proposal to provide states with money to hire more teachers and first-responders, which would have cost about $30 billion. …

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Obama Denies 'Bloated Government'; Data Contradict Assertion, Show Increase in Federal Employees
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