Real Consequences of Delaying F-35 Program; Slowing Production Will Increase Costs and Keep Pilots in Obsolete Fighters

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 14, 2012 | Go to article overview

Real Consequences of Delaying F-35 Program; Slowing Production Will Increase Costs and Keep Pilots in Obsolete Fighters


Byline: Gens. John D.W. Corley and William R. Looney III, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Although American warriors have returned from Iraq and many are re- turning from Afghan-istan, our nation still faces serious and continuing security threats. The return - and painful loss - of U.S. combat troops should serve as a reminder that as a nation, we have a solemn duty to provide our military professionals with the best tools available to accomplish their missions at the lowest possible loss of life. The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter falls squarely into that category.

Simply put, the multirole F-35 is a critical element in the struggle to safeguard national security. The most technically advanced multirole fighter aircraft in the world today, it represents an indispensable leap in capability and survivability over the current generation of fighters it is designed to replace. With advanced stealth and fully integrated avionics systems, the F-35 will enable pilots to penetrate into hostile territory, secure vital airspace or support ground forces with precision strike capabilities and then return safely.

Like other military systems procured over the past half-century, the F-35 is being tested, refined and produced simultaneously in a process known as concurrency. By interrelating testing and production, the F-35 program achieves efficiencies that help control costs, drive refinements and speed the delivery of aircraft to our armed services. Concurrency has been a key element in the strategy for bringing this new aircraft into our nation's fighter force in a timely manner and at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayers - until now.

Unfortunately, today some argue that there is too much concurrency in the F-35 program and claim that production should remain at a low rate. Despite the fact that the program exceeded its flight test goals for 2011 and is ahead of the planned flight test goals for 2012, some contend the F-35 is not yet ready to begin high-rate production. This flawed argument injects significant operational risk above the already negative impacts from three previous years of program reductions that moved 425 aircraft deliveries to later years.

Continuing to keep F-35 production at low rates will be a costly mistake. F-35 cost is based on consistent and predictable increases in production rates to maintain program affordability. Those increases allow the fixed production costs to be spread over more units each year, lowering the incremental cost per plane. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Real Consequences of Delaying F-35 Program; Slowing Production Will Increase Costs and Keep Pilots in Obsolete Fighters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.