Develop a Passion for Lifelong Learning; Wh T B K D Whatever Your Age or Background, There Are No Barriers to Continuing Your Education and Improving Your Life

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), May 15, 2012 | Go to article overview

Develop a Passion for Lifelong Learning; Wh T B K D Whatever Your Age or Background, There Are No Barriers to Continuing Your Education and Improving Your Life


LOOKING to learn? Then there's never been a better time to rekindle your love of learning.

Whether you are looking to brush up on existing skills or discover new ones, there are plenty of opportunities out there just waiting to be snapped up. From part-time refresher courses and evening classes to apprenticeships, college programmes and university degrees, there really is something to suit absolutely every type of learner.

With Adult Learning Week now in full swing, all the information you need to get ahead is at your fingertips.

To help you on your way, we talk to three inspirational people who have transformed their lives through lifelong learning.

Andrew Ferrie LIFELONG learning is something Andrew Ferrie knows a lot about. Aged 86, he has been in education for more than eight decades.

Despite leaving school at 14, he has studied dozens of subjects and picked up plenty of qualifications - including O-Grades, Highers and a degree. He's even found time to write his own book.

An active member of his local community in Dundee, Andrew has spent his whole life learning.

From evening classes and hands-on education to full-time study, there's no type of learning he hasn't experienced.

What's more, he does all he can to encourage others to learn something new - no matter what their age.

Andrew said: "I would have liked to stay on at school but being the oldest of five children I needed to help with the cost of the family.

"So I started work as a message boy for the Gas Corporation and at the same time studied for the Municipal exam.

"It meant I could work for the council and eventually I got a job with the wages and salary department.

"One of my friends wasn't so lucky and ended up dealing with slaughterhouse work.

"I have always loved learning for the expansion of knowledge and I like finding out about things I've never known about. I'm not the kind of person that can just sit."

Being called up in 1945, Andrew served three years in the forces - spending 18 months in Italy and learning Italian to get by. And after returning home and getting married, he was soon back at the books.

Starting with an Intermediary Certificate in accountancy, which he achieved through home study, he went on to learn a variety of different skills and subjects throughout the 1950s and 60s.

Studying English, German, maths and Italian, it wasn't long before Andrew's thirst for learning was picked up and he soon started supporting others.

Over the years, he has helped prisoners with their literacy skills and set up learning groups and partnerships, as well as tutoring hundreds of people throughout the Dundee area.

A founding member of the University of the Third Age - a self-help co-operative for older people - he is also involved in Dundee's Menolej project, a learning group specifically devised for "men of leisure".

Supported by Dundee City Council it organises fun events which involve both learning and physical activity.

Andrew said: "The beauty of Menolej is that it covers both sides, the cultural aspects that stimulate the mind and the physical side of things such as walking.

"It improves the physical and mental health of people taking part."

Even in retirement, Andrew has not slowed down and still runs language and literacy classes - as well as taking classes of his own.

I'm still on path of discovery after eight decades I've gone from asylum seeker to student mentor Sadia Ismail Sharif ARRIVING in Glasgow as an asylum seeker back in 2003, Sadia Ismail Sharif felt scared and alone.

With her family and friends trapped in her home country of Somalia, she found herself in a foreign country with no knowledge of the local language. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Develop a Passion for Lifelong Learning; Wh T B K D Whatever Your Age or Background, There Are No Barriers to Continuing Your Education and Improving Your Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.