An Easy Response to 'Why Do I Have to Learn This?' the Common Core State Standards in English/language Arts Help Define What It Means to Be College and Career Ready, as Well as Responsible Citizens

By Manthey, George | Leadership, May-June 2012 | Go to article overview

An Easy Response to 'Why Do I Have to Learn This?' the Common Core State Standards in English/language Arts Help Define What It Means to Be College and Career Ready, as Well as Responsible Citizens


Manthey, George, Leadership


So what does it mean to be college and career ready? The creators of the Common Core Standards may have provided an answer to that question for English language arts--at least with the anchor standards they developed for reading, writing, listening and speaking, and language.

The Common Core English language arts standards are organized so that each of the standards (K-12) support one of these anchor standards. It was recently suggested to me that I add the anchor standards to the standards progression page I've included in ACSA's Standard Finder, and in doing that I gained a new perspective about the power of these standards.

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Here is a sampling of them:

In reading:

No. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

No. 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

No. 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

In writing:

No. 8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

No. 9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.

In speaking and listening:

No. 3. Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

No. 4. Present information, findings and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, and the organization, development and style are appropriate to task, purpose and audience. …

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An Easy Response to 'Why Do I Have to Learn This?' the Common Core State Standards in English/language Arts Help Define What It Means to Be College and Career Ready, as Well as Responsible Citizens
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