Larson: Welcome to Boomer Baseball

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Larson: Welcome to Boomer Baseball


Larson: Welcome to Boomer baseball

To the editor: When I was a kid in Chicago, playing baseball in the vacant lot across from my house (in my neighborhood we called it the prairie), there would come a time in midsummer when the baseball would be so good, the fun would be so intense, the spirit of the game would be so all-consuming, that we just didn't want the sun to go down. If we could just freeze those last minutes of light, the game could go on and on -- forever.

And that's baseball. It is the only game where time doesn't matter. It is the only game where if one hits good enough, if one plays good enough, the game could go on forever.

And I think that is why baseball captures the imagination. In some form or another, we all would like the game to go on forever. We all would like to freeze the light, stop the sun from going down, and recapture and keep that feeling of boyhood or girlhood that we all knew, and be able to laugh and play and be with good friends in the warm summer of our lives.

Baseball does that. Certainly here at Boomer Field in Schaumburg it does that.

This is the way it should be. About family and friends and sunlight and summer. About being safe -- and coming home.

Welcome to Boomer baseball -- right here in Schaumburg.

Al Larson

Village President

village of Schaumburg

Post office loss just business, apparently

To the editor: So Rolling Meadows is losing our post office. What could the building owner possibly put in that space that would be of more service to the community? Oh, I forgot. Service to the community is not a priority.

Penny Bailey

Rolling Meadows

Bad intersection can be made much safer

To the editor: Since I can remember, Dundee and St. Armand Drive has been a dangerous intersection. Not only do people turning eastbound and westbound on Dundee Road conveniently forget to put their cellphones down and use their turn signals, people also pass turning cars on the right of them to head straight through the intersection, so people think they are clear to turn, causing accidents.

And sometimes a school bus has to take evasive action to avoid a collision, and crashing into people who don't turn right on red correctly. What is my thought?

* Change the light sequences to those used at Route 83 and Palatine Road, where one direction takes turns to head through the intersection.

* Make it a "No turn on red" intersection.

Since most everyone thinks it is their God-given right to drive, rather than a privilege, something has to be done!

Al Sprehe Jr.

Wheeling

Girl, 8, disappointed by autograph event

To the editor: Friday, April 27, a sports store in Woodfield Mall sponsored a public event where they had two Chicago Bulls players on site to autograph items the local people brought in to the store. The event was held from 5-6 p.m. There was a very long waiting line.

My 8-year-old granddaughter and 10-year-old grandson, along with their mother and grandmother, waited in line for two hours to get their basketballs autographed.

And they were excited, as you can imagine.

When it was their turn for the autographs, my grandson got his basketball signed, but both of the Bulls refused to sign my granddaughter's small pink basketball because it was made by Nike. …

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