China's Population-Control Holocaust; the Bloody History of 'Limits to Growth'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 22, 2012 | Go to article overview

China's Population-Control Holocaust; the Bloody History of 'Limits to Growth'


Byline: Robert Zubrin, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

On May 7, South Korean customs authorities announced they had discovered 17,500 capsules made from the incinerated remains of human fetuses and infants being smuggled into the country from China for sale. Coming in the wake of the high-profile drama concerning the effort of the Chinese government to suppress the voice of the brave, blind anti-population-control activist Chen Guangcheng, this news has placed the issue of the regime's brutal one-child law forcefully before the conscience of the world. Therefore, a look at the origin and history of this atrocity is in order.

In June 1978, Song Jian, a top-level manager in charge of developing control systems for the Chinese guided-missile program, traveled to Helsinki for an international conference on control-system theory and design. While in Finland, he picked up copies of The Limits to Growth and Blueprint for Survival - publications of the Club of Rome, a major source of Malthusian propaganda - and made the acquaintance of several Europeans who were promoting the report's method of using computerized systems analysis to predict and design the human future.

Fascinated by the possibilities, Mr. Song returned to China and republished the Club's analysis under his own name (without attribution), establishing his reputation for brilliant and original thinking. In no time at all, Mr. Song became a scientific superstar. Seizing the moment to grasp for greater power and importance, he pulled together an elite group of mathematicians from within his department and, with the help of a powerful computer to provide the necessary special effects, issued the profoundly calculated judgment that China's correct population size was 650 million to 700 million people - which is to say, some 280 million to 330 million less than its actual 1978 population.

Mr. Song's analysis quickly found favor at top levels of the Chinese Communist Party because it purported to prove that the reason for China's continued poverty was not 30 years of disastrous misrule, but the very existence of the Chinese people. Paramount leader Deng Xiaoping and his fellows in the Central Committee were very impressed by the pseudo-scientific computer babble Mr. Song used to dress up his theory and even more impressed by the possibilities that arrogating the power to permit or deny children would provide to the state.

Thus began the most forceful population-control program since Nazi Germany. Qian Xinzhong, a Soviet-trained former major general in the People's Liberation Army, was placed in charge of the campaign. He ordered all women with one child to have a stainless steel IUD inserted and to be inspected regularly to make sure they had not tampered with it. …

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