Obama's Democratic Challenger: Randall Terry Is Barack Obama's Democratic Challenger in the 2012 Presidential Election, but He Isn't in the Race to Win. He's in It So That Obama Doesn't Win

By Kenny, Jack | The New American, May 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Obama's Democratic Challenger: Randall Terry Is Barack Obama's Democratic Challenger in the 2012 Presidential Election, but He Isn't in the Race to Win. He's in It So That Obama Doesn't Win


Kenny, Jack, The New American


Randall Terry has an unusual message for a candidate for any office, let alone the highest office in the land. "I don't even tell people to vote for me," said Terry, who has been running all year in Democratic presidential primaries and caucuses. "I just say you can't vote for Obama."

The Plan

The founder of Operation Rescue, the anti-abortion group best known for blocking access to abortion clinics, Terry entered the presidential fray on the Democratic side for the sole purpose of defeating Barack Obama. Though he made brief mention of what he called Obama's "addiction to Muslim oil," during a telephone interview with THE NEW AMERICAN, Terry's focus is clearly on bringing down the President for his support of unrestricted abortion and for the administration's requirement that religious-affiliated institutions, such as Catholic hospitals and universities, make insurance coverage for contraception, sterilization, and abortion-inducing drugs available to their employees under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. While the Terry campaign has received little attention from the national media, it has not escaped the attention of Democratic Party officials. Terry believes they got an unexpected wake-up call when the anti-abortion firebrand got 18 percent of the vote in the March 6 caucuses in Oklahoma.

"We beat [Obama] in 14 counties," Terry said. "This terrified them." His share of the vote appeared to entitle him to one delegate, thereby ensuring that Obama's renomination would not be unanimous when Democrats convene in Charlotte, North Carolina in September. But the Democratic Party in Oklahoma later ruled he is not entitled to the delegate, since he failed to produce the required paperwork and missed a March 15 deadline to identify a delegate. "Nobody in the state of Oklahoma said, 'I pledge to be a delegate for Randall Terry,'" said party chairman Wallace Collins, who notified Terry of the decision in a certified letter. Terry contacted a lawyer in Oklahoma to challenge that decision.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

He was not on the ballot for the April 14 caucuses in Kansas, where the state Democratic Party ruled he did not qualify due to his missing deadlines for naming his state representative and for filing a plan to encourage participation in the caucuses by potential delegates, the Wichita Eagle reported, while quoting party attorney Joe Sandler's assertion that Terry "is not a bona fide Democrat, as determined by his actions." Terry contends the filing is a moot point because he intends to be his own representative. And he disputes the notion that party officials have the right to determine who is a "bona fide Democrat."

"The Supreme Court has already ruled you cannot have a litmus test of who can be a candidate and who can be a voter in a primary," Terry told the Wichita paper, as he promised to take his ballot access battle to court. "This is like Obama pretending he's Fidel Castro. 'I won the election and now I'm the only one you can vote for.'"

Terry's candidacy in Democratic primaries is, to say the least, unusual. A self-described "lifelong Republican," he ran and lost in a Republican primary for Congress in upstate New York in 1998, then ran as the Right to Life Party candidate in the general election, finishing third with seven percent of the vote. In 2008, he led a demonstration of anti-abortion protesters at the Democratic National Convention in Minnesota. He makes no secret of his goal to draw socially conservative Democratic voters away from Obama and foil the President's bid for a second term. For Terry the primaries are secondary in importance. His ultimate goal is to be on the ballot for the general election in a number of "swing states he believes will be critical to Obama's reelection.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"I will be running my ads in Florida, Virginia and Colorado," he said. "And we're still exploring Ohio, Iowa and Indiana. …

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