Top GSA Official Tried to Hide Report on Vegas; Wanted to Avoid 'Muffin' Scandal

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 6, 2012 | Go to article overview

Top GSA Official Tried to Hide Report on Vegas; Wanted to Avoid 'Muffin' Scandal


Byline: Jim McElhatton, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A top administrator at the General Services Administration who worked on President Obama's presidential transition team sought to keep secret the agency report that uncovered massive waste at a lavish taxpayer-funded GSA conference in Las Vegas, records show.

The 2010 conference, which cost $823,000 and featured a mind-reader, clowns, magicians and a red-carpet party, forced the ouster of several top GSA officials after the agency's Office of Inspector General released its findings in April.

But months earlier, as word of the report was circulating among GSA officials, Ruth F. Cox, the agency's regional administrator for several Western states, contacted a colleague in Washington asking what could be done to shield the report from public view.

Is there something we can do to prevent another potential embarrassing episode from unfolding and keep this report from being made public? she asked in an email obtained by The Washington Times.

Ms. Cox also expressed concern that the inspector general's report was not entirely correct, though officials now say her comments were made before she saw the final report.

We don't need another $16 muffin public allegation that is eventually proven wrong and the damage is already done (and exacerbated by making a false allegation), she wrote in an email she deemed highly confidential.

Ms. Cox was referring to a report by the Justice Department's Office of Inspector General, which reviewed conference expenditures and later retracted one widely publicized finding concerning muffins initially reported to have cost $16 each.

Adam Elkington, an agency spokesman, said Tuesday that Ms. Cox made the comments in the email before the release of the inspector general's report and before having any knowledge of the findings.

GSA, including Ms. Cox, is appalled by the missteps highlighted in the IG's report and have taken disciplinary action against those responsible, accepted all of the IG's recommendations and continue to take steps to ensure this never happens again, Mr. Elkington wrote in an email to The Times.

We welcome oversight and will continue to be guided by the highest level of transparency. GSA's new Acting Administrator Dan Tangherlini initiated a top-to-bottom review of our agency's operations. GSA remains committed to eliminating excessive federal spending and promoting government efficiency.

In the email, Ms. Cox also referred to Jeffrey Neely, former acting administrator for the region, who played a key role in organizing the conference and was seen on video boasting about how much fun the federal workers were having in Las Vegas. …

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