Home Tutorial for Child with Autism

Manila Bulletin, June 10, 2012 | Go to article overview

Home Tutorial for Child with Autism


MANILA, Philippines --- QUESTION: I have a daughter with autism. I would like to ask if it's ok to get a special education tutor to teach her at home instead of in school? She often exhibits violent tantrums. Once I tried bringing her to school, with the usual desensitization beforehand, she still had a tantrum. I want to try if home tutoring would work. How would you recommend I go about this? Thank you. - Mommy Z

Children with autism find it difficult to interact and control their own behavior. They sometimes respond with violent behavior that may be due to any or all of the following:

* Being placed in a stressful situation

* Exhaustion

* Extreme frustration or anger

*Inadequate speech development

* Lack of adult supervision

* Lack of routine

*Mirroring the aggressive behaviors of other kids around them

* Over-stimulation

* Self-defense

Before deciding on having your child for tutorial services, find out the reasons of your child's challenging behavior because it is more fitting that she goes to school to develop her cognitive skills as well as modify her behavior. Follow this four-stage approach to tackle the child's problem behavior.

Identification of the problem behavior. Write down the type of aggression your child demonstrates along with the time and setting of when the behavior occurs.

Understanding why a person with autism is behaving a certain way. What is the function of the behavior shown by your child? Is she telling you she doesn't like going to school? Is she telling that something is wrong in the school where she is studying? Does she want to do something instead of going to school? Identifying the "communication" behind the behavior is the first step to teaching appropriate behaviors that can convey the person's needs and desires.

Management. The information gathered may guide you and your child's school in developing a plan to modify her challenging behavior (tantrums) which the special education teachers can design. Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and behavior modification techniques are effective techniques in reducing aggressive behaviors which can be provided by the school therapist.

Prevention. Aggressive behaviors can be prevented by preparing a rewarding environment for the child. Prompting the child through visual timetables and structure schedules prepare the child on how to behave properly for every activity for the day. Use tools such as social stories to help the child learn more appropriate and acceptable behaviors.

COPING WITH CHALLENGING BEHAVIOR

Here are techniques researched for parents to understand the challenging behaviors of children with autism.

Reducing aggressive behavior - Aggression in children with autism often occurs in public places. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Home Tutorial for Child with Autism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.