The Many Forms of Racism

Manila Bulletin, January 15, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Many Forms of Racism


MANILA, Philippines - Despite the thin veneer of civilized behavior, racism still exists in America in many forms today.

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"Many people in the US continue to have some prejudices against other races. In the view of the US Human rights Network, discrimination permeates all aspects of life in the United States, and extends to all communities of color.

"Discrimination against African Americans, Latin Americans, and Muslims is widely acknowledged. Members of every major American ethnic minority have perceived racism in their dealings with other minority groups," according to a study entitled Racism in America.

"This ugly truth rears its head especially during election campaigns, and Herman Cain, the GOP presidential contender, became one of the latest victim of racial bigotry.

"Once he became a presidential front runner, his sins of the past were visited, and he was forced to back out of the race for alleged sexual peccadilloes.

"President Barack Obama, the first black American president, is having a difficult time governing due to the opposition of some Republicans, who cannot abide a black man in the White House to succeed."

Now the latest example of discrimination was shown by Newt Gingrich, one of the GOP front-runners, whose slur was aimed at his fellow presidential contender, Mitt Romney, for being able to speak French.

Romney had spent two years as a Mormon missionary in France.

A new web ad released by Gingrich's campaign titled "The French Connection" compares Romney to other politicians from Massachusetts, including former governor Michael Dukakis and Sen. John Kerry, both former Democratic presidential nominees. …

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