Stand-Off at the NAIA

Manila Bulletin, November 18, 2011 | Go to article overview

Stand-Off at the NAIA


MANILA, Philppines - The scene at the NAIA airport last November 15 looked like one lifted from a local movie, one that you would like to blot out from your memory as it again put the country in a negative light. It was almost as bad as the Luneta incident which resulted in the death of several Hong Kong tourists, except that no one was physically hurt in the later incident.

The similarity was that both were consequences of bad communication and coordination among government agencies. The airport drama succeeded, however, in showing some of the worst aspects of our culture - "lusot" or tendency to outsmart the other (the Arroyos attempt to leave the country without formal clearance from DoJ), taking short cuts (Supreme Court justices hastily issued the TRO without giving due scrutiny to background documents); and finally, the absence of what I consider a most critical attribute in all aspects of governance - "trust" (among all parties concerned). Its presence could have generated the needed goodwill that could have prevented the occurrence of that brouhaha that again intrigued the international press.

Perhaps even Secretary De Lima could have tempered her sense of justice with a little mercy. Perhaps too, the Arroyos could have waited for a few more hours, a few more days. But the upside is that we learned lessons which could perhaps help in the design of content for orientation of public officials, systems, and procedures for implementing policies, and structures for inter-agency coordination.

They would be useful guidelines for all of us when we examine our roles as citizens of this country. The recent incident reinforced a general characteristic of our decision (individual or collective) processes - the lack of a comprehensive framework that would enable us to understand the relationship between the personal and cultural, the political, the economic or the ethical/moral aspects of an issue or problem.

This kind of self-reflection is similar to what National Artist Frankie Sionil Jose would like a sector in our society to do. They are those concerned with culture (artist, teachers, art patrons, cultural activists); media practitioners, and select decision makers in the private sector and government. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Stand-Off at the NAIA
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.