Feel the Rhythm: Music Technology

By Hummell, Laura J. | Children's Technology and Engineering, December 2011 | Go to article overview

Feel the Rhythm: Music Technology


Hummell, Laura J., Children's Technology and Engineering


Neil Ardley. Eyewitness Music

DK Publishing, Inc., New York, NY, www.dk.com; ISBN 0-7566-0709-4; $15.99 hard

cover

summary

Did you know that you can see and feel music--not just hear it?! Think about how the beat of a drum mimics your heartbeat. Thump--thump, thump-thump. Think about your favorite song. What do you like about it? Do the words rhyme? Is it the rhythm that makes your feet start tapping in time to the melody? Can you sing along? Share some of your favorites with your teacher and classmates. What do they have in common? How are they different? What types of music do you like the most?

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Music is the lifeblood of every culture in the world. Music transcends language and differences around the globe. Even when people don't agree about many things, they share a love of good music. But, what does "good" music mean? It means different things to different people. It has the power to communicate ideas, to show emotion, to express feelings with or without words. Lyrics become poetry or vice versa. Musicians become messengers expressing life and passion using instruments or their voices.

student introduction

Be an eyewitness to the creation of music of all kinds and the amazing instruments that produce the beautiful melodies and harmonies we call MUSIC!

Learn why a violin player needs a frog. Discover how the ripples of sound resonate from different types of drums, and understand what an oboe and snake charmer's gourd have in common.

From accordions to zithers, learn about the magical, mystical world of musical instruments.

design brief

Suggested Grade Levels/Ages: K-3, Ages 5-8

project ideas

After reading Nell Ardley's book Eyewitness Music together and listening to some music, research music online. Then, you can:

* Write an original song.

* Create a musical instrument using common household items or discarded things.

* Discover how you can see and feel music through technology.

* Research different musical instruments.

* Research music genres.

* Research and create a slideshow or video about your favorite music or song.

* Draw a picture that illustrates a piece of music and what it means to you.

teacher hints

* Review the different types of musical instruments, music basics, musical techniques, music vocabulary, proper handling of different musical instruments, digital music systems, and musical techniques for creating original songs. …

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