Michael McFaul

By Nemtsova, Anna | Newsweek, June 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

Michael McFaul


Nemtsova, Anna, Newsweek


Byline: Anna Nemtsova

A diplomat with a big mouth--and a big mission.

It's a turbulent moment to be Washington's Man in Russia, where protests against Vladimir Putin are rocking the country with a level of turmoil not seen since the days of the Soviet collapse. In January the Obama administration parachuted in new ambassador Michael McFaul, an earnest Stanford academic who has admitted that he's "still learning the craft of speaking more diplomatically." He's already provoked the Kremlin into tweeting about his "unprofessionalism," and he's winning fast friends among Russian activists for his unabashed opposition to authoritarian regimes.

It's unlikely that McFaul could have guessed how controversial his appointment would be back when he helped forge Obama's "reset" with Russia. The whole point of the policy was to defuse years of growing tensions between the White House and the Kremlin. The thaw appeared to be gaining momentum until Putin retook the presidency earlier this year, which set off massive Arab Spring-like protests in the capital. When McFaul took up his duties--as only the second noncareer diplomat to be appointed ambassador to Russia in 30 years--he found himself smack in the middle of an explosive situation. In his first month on the job, he was visited by pro-democracy activists; the meeting provoked an outcry in the state-backed media, which accused McFaul of conspiring with the opposition.

Since then the attacks on McFaul by Putin loyalists have only grown more incensed. The Russian Foreign Ministry has accused him of spreading "blatant falsehoods," and McFaul has indicated that his phone and his email and Twitter accounts have been hacked. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Michael McFaul
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.