Women on Top

By Dana, Rebecca | Newsweek, June 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

Women on Top


Dana, Rebecca, Newsweek


Byline: Rebecca Dana

No thanks to men.

Every socioeconomic trend suggests women are storming the barricades of corporate America. But, two recent studies suggest, they aren't getting much help from men.

The first study, a multiyear survey of business-school graduates by the nonprofit research group Catalyst, finds that women are far more likely to help women advance than men are. Debunking the queen bee stereotype, in which female bosses are especially hard on their female subordinates, the study found that 73 percent of women who mentored colleagues helped other women, while only 30 percent of men did. "The biggest surprise for me was that men are doing so little for women, says Catalyst chief Ilene Lang. "I really thought that there were more men speaking up."

Not only are men not speaking up, some are holding women back. The second study, conducted by social scientists at Harvard, NYU, and the University of North Carolina, evaluated how men's domestic lives affected their treatment of women in the workplace. It found that those whose home lives are most traditional--married men with stay-at-home wives--were more likely to have retrograde attitudes toward women at the office. …

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