Undercover Detective in Eco Trial Fiasco Now Works for US Firm That Spies on Activists

The Evening Standard (London, England), June 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Undercover Detective in Eco Trial Fiasco Now Works for US Firm That Spies on Activists


Byline: Tom Harper

Tom Harper Investigations Reporter A FORMER Scotland Yard police officer whose eight years undercover with eco-warriors led to the collapse of a criminal trial is working for a US company that targets anti-capitalist demonstrators, the Standard can reveal. Mark Kennedy is a consultant for the Densus Group, a Dallas-based firm run by a former British Army officer that once gathered intelligence on protesters at a G20 summit.

Working from his new home in Cleveland, Ohio, the 42-year-old provides "risk and threat assessments" to companies that suspect they might fall victim to "direct action".

This is the first indication of Mr Kennedy's new job since his extraordinary work as an undercover Met officer halted the trial of six environmental activists accused of trying to shut down the Ratcliffe-on-Soar power station in Nottinghamshire in 2009.

The policeman made covert recordings that proved the campaigners were innocent, but "collective failings" by the Met and the Crown Prosecution Service meant that they were not shared with defence lawyers.

The embarrassing case triggered a national review of undercover policing, while Mr Kennedy fled to America.

He was later criticised when it emerged that he had had sexual relationships with two of the activists. In a job description published online, Mr Kennedy said: "My experience is drawn from 20 years as a British police officer, the last 10 of which were deployed as a covert operative working within extreme left political and animal rights groups throughout the UK, Europe and the US providing exacting intelligence upon which risk and threat assessment analysis could be made. …

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